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School Volunteering

4 Tips for Avoiding Stress & Addressing Parent Peer Pressure

Do you feel pressure to volunteer for every classroom activity you can? Spreading yourself thin by raising your hand to help with everything from recess to weekly reading, field trips and class parties does no one good! Neither does feeling guilty when you can’t be present in the classroom every month. Try these 4 tips for losing the guilt and finding joy in classroom volunteering:

NightmareMom1) Do the BEST you can: You know when you’ve given it your all, then it was time well-spent. Whether it’s one or three things you’re able to help out with in the classroom this month, commit 100% and immerse yourself in the beauty of making a difference in the classroom.

2) Help from home: Full-time jobs and busy family schedules do not an easy time make for helping out in the classroom. If being physically present isn’t in the cards, find creative and interesting ways to help the class from home > from making cutouts for bulletin boards and door decs, to managing the class blog/website, organizing class photos, and more > there are tons of ‘from home’ jobs to do. More ideas here

3) Organize parents online: Free online volunteer calendars with auto-reminders truly do save time and relieve stress when it comes to coordinating parents to help in the classroom. With teacher and room parent oversight, online sign ups encourage more parents to get involved by making it easier to sign up; it also helps keep track of classroom activities that need parent help across several months at a time. With mobile access and email reminders*

4) Do something you enjoy: One of the easiest ways to turn school volunteering from a stressful task into an enjoyable time is to volunteer for something you truly like doing. Find joy in reading to kids? Ask the room mom if you can get in on the weekly reader schedule instead of feeling pressured into helping with a field trip. Have a unique skill or talent? Create a volunteer opportunity for yourself by offering the teacher an enrichment lesson you can lead or designing an activity to run at the next class party.